The Ancestors and Cousins of Tracy Lynn DeVault

Person Page 637

Living Mosier

F, #15901

Parents

Pedigree Link

Living Mosier

F, #15902

Parents

Pedigree Link

Living Mosier

M, #15903

Parents

Pedigree Link

Living Mosier

M, #15904

Parents

Pedigree Link

Esther Miller Waldron1,2,3,4

F, #15905, b. 10 August 1893, d. 14 April 1963

Parents

Pedigree Link

Family: David Sullins DeVault (b. 19 December 1876, d. 7 July 1963)

SonDavid Sullins DeVault, Jr.+ (b. 11 October 1918, d. November 1980)
SonMilton Henry "Bud" DeVault+ (b. 10 November 1921, d. 6 September 1950)
DaughterJoan Esther DeVault+ (b. 6 March 1930, d. 11 April 2013)

BASIC FACTS

Esther Miller Waldron was born on 10 August 1893 in Amsterdam, Montgomery Co., New York.1,2,4 She and David Sullins DeVault were married on 23 June 1916 in Amsterdam, Montgomery Co., New York.5,6,4 She died on 14 April 1963, at age 69.7 She was buried in Green Hill Cemetery, Amsterdam, Montgomery Co., New York.7
Esther Miller Waldron had reference number 16193. She was enumerated on the census in Knox County, Tennessee (1920); Fairfield County, Connecticut (1930.) She was a Teacher.8 She was baptized on 21 June 1931 in Darien, Fairfield Co., Connecticut.4

Citations

  1. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  2. [S1435] 1920 Census, Tennessee, Knox County
  3. [S1575] 1930 Census, Connecticut, Fairfield County
  4. [S5553] Genealogy prepared by David Sullins DeVault (see photo album images)
  5. [S2717] Book: A DeVault Genealogy with Gillmore and Hunt Supplements by William B. Gillmore, 1954
  6. [S5511] Genealogy prepared by Dan DeVault
  7. [S11941] Phone conversation with Joan Esther (DeVault) Snyder, July 29, 2011
  8. [S2415] Article - Mrs. David S. DeVault, "My Son Died in Korea", Feb 15 1951 issue of Ladies Home Journal

David Sullins DeVault, Jr.1,2,3

M, #15906, b. 11 October 1918, d. November 1980

Parents

FatherDavid Sullins DeVault (b. 19 December 1876, d. 7 July 1963)
MotherEsther Miller Waldron (b. 10 August 1893, d. 14 April 1963)
Pedigree Link

Family: Kathryn Ellen "Kay" Anable (b. 21 October 1921, d. 15 February 1997)

SonLiving DeVault
SonLiving DeVault
SonLiving DeVault
SonLiving DeVault

BASIC FACTS

David Sullins DeVault, Jr., was born on 11 October 1918 in Syracuse, Onondaga Co., New York.1 He and Kathryn Ellen "Kay" Anable were married on 27 June 1946 in New York.4,5 He died in November 1980, at age 62, in Rochester, Monroe Co., New York.6 He was buried in Sandy Creek Cemetery, Murray, Orleans Co., New York.7
David Sullins DeVault, Jr., had reference number 16194. He resided in Hanford, Benton Co., Washington; Yakima, Yakima Co., Washington; Holley, Orleans Co., New York.1,6,8 His Social Security Number was 050-16-9349, issued: New York, last residence: Holley, Orleans Co., New York.6 World War II, USMC, Corporal, Service Squadron #22.7,9 He was enumerated on the census in Knox County, Tennessee (1920); Fairfield County, Connecticut (1930.)

NEWSPAPER ARTICLE - Amsterdam Evening Recorder, Friday October 11, 1918, page 3

A son was born this morning to Mr. and Mrs. David DeVault of Syracuse. Mrs. DeVault was formerly Miss Esther Waldron of this city.

GRAVE MARKER

DAVID S. DeVAULT JR.
U S MARINE CORPS WW II
1918 - 1980.

Citations

  1. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  2. [S1435] 1920 Census, Tennessee, Knox County
  3. [S1575] 1930 Census, Connecticut, Fairfield County
  4. [S5511] Genealogy prepared by Dan DeVault
  5. [S5553] Genealogy prepared by David Sullins DeVault (see photo album images)
  6. [S12037] Social Security Death Index, Source Medium: Book
  7. [S2914] Cemetery Records - Sandy Creek Cemetery, Murray, Orleans Co., New York (Internet)
  8. [S2415] Article - Mrs. David S. DeVault, "My Son Died in Korea", Feb 15 1951 issue of Ladies Home Journal
  9. [S12111] U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Applications 1889 - 1970 (Ancestry.com)

Kathryn Ellen "Kay" Anable1,2

F, #15907, b. 21 October 1921, d. 15 February 1997

Parents

Pedigree Link

Family: David Sullins DeVault, Jr., (b. 11 October 1918, d. November 1980)

SonLiving DeVault
SonLiving DeVault
SonLiving DeVault
SonLiving DeVault

BASIC FACTS

Kathryn Ellen "Kay" Anable was born on 21 October 1921 in Coxsackie, Greene Co., New York.2 She was born on 21 October 1921 in Hudson, Columbia Co., New York.1,3,4,2 She and David Sullins DeVault, Jr., were married on 27 June 1946 in New York.5,3 She died on 15 February 1997, at age 75.6,4,2 She was buried in Sandy Creek Cemetery, Murray, Orleans Co., New York.4
Kathryn Ellen "Kay" Anable was also known as Catherine Anabel.7,3 She was also known as Kathryn Anabel.3 She was also known as Catheryn Annabelle Hudson.8 She had reference number 16195. Her Social Security Number was 054-16-9837, issued: New York, last residence: Hamlin, Monroe Co., New York.9 She was enumerated on the census in Columbia County, New York (1930, 1940.)

GRAVE MARKER

KATHRYN E. DeVAULT
BELOVED WIFE & MOTHER
1921 - 1997.

Citations

  1. [S1818] 1930 Census, New York, Columbia County
  2. [S12093] U.S. Social Security Application and Claims Index, 1936 - 2007 (Ancestry.com)
  3. [S5553] Genealogy prepared by David Sullins DeVault (see photo album images)
  4. [S4861] Find A Grave (Internet), Source Medium: Book
  5. [S5511] Genealogy prepared by Dan DeVault
  6. [S11941] Phone conversation with Joan Esther (DeVault) Snyder, July 29, 2011
  7. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  8. [S2717] Book: A DeVault Genealogy with Gillmore and Hunt Supplements by William B. Gillmore, 1954
  9. [S12038] Social Security Death Index, Source Medium: Book

Living DeVault

M, #15908

Parents

FatherDavid Sullins DeVault, Jr. (b. 11 October 1918, d. November 1980)
MotherKathryn Ellen "Kay" Anable (b. 21 October 1921, d. 15 February 1997)
Pedigree Link

Living DeVault

M, #15909

Parents

FatherDavid Sullins DeVault, Jr. (b. 11 October 1918, d. November 1980)
MotherKathryn Ellen "Kay" Anable (b. 21 October 1921, d. 15 February 1997)
Pedigree Link

Milton Henry "Bud" DeVault1,2

M, #15910, b. 10 November 1921, d. 6 September 1950

Parents

FatherDavid Sullins DeVault (b. 19 December 1876, d. 7 July 1963)
MotherEsther Miller Waldron (b. 10 August 1893, d. 14 April 1963)
Pedigree Link

Family: Gayle Elaine Walsh (b. 30 September 1918, d. 1 August 2001)

SonGregory Duncan-DeVault

BASIC FACTS

Milton Henry "Bud" DeVault was born on 10 November 1921 in Syracuse, Onondaga Co., New York.1 He was born on 10 November 1921 in Amsterdam.3 He and Gayle Elaine Walsh were married on 12 July 1950 in Thurston Co., Washington.4,5 He died on 6 September 1950, at age 28, in Korea.1 He was buried in Green Hill Cemetery, Amsterdam, Montgomery Co., New York.6
Milton Henry "Bud" DeVault had reference number 16198. Korean War; U.S. Army; Company C, 72nd Medium Tank Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division; First Lieutenant; O-27597.1,7 He was educated Graduate of West Point.7 He was enumerated on the census in Fairfield County, Connecticut (1930.)

DEATH NOTICE - The Morning Olympian, Olympia, Washington, Sunday, October 1, 1950, Page 2

Olympian Dies In Korea Fight
Mrs. Gayle Walsh DeVault of Olympia has received word from the Defense Department that her husband, First Lieutenant Milton H. DeVault, was killed in action in Korea.
Lieutenant DeVault was with the 72nd Heavy Tank Battalion which was stationed at Fort Lewis prior to moving to the Orient.
He and Mrs. DeVault, daughter of Mrs. Frank Walsh, were married in Olympia twelve days before he sailed for the Port of Pusan, Korea, early in August. He was a native of Amsterdam, New York, the son of Mr. and Mrs. David S. DeVault, Amsterdam, New York. He was graduated from West Point Military Academy in 1945, receiving a commission in the United States Army at that time. Besides his wife and parents, Lieutenant DeVault is survived by a brother in Yakima and a sister, Joan DeVault, in Amsterdam.

Note from the WWI, WWII and Korean War Casualty Listing
USMA Class of 1945, First Lieutenant De Vault was a veteran of World War II. In Korea, he was a member of Company C, 72nd Medium Tank Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division. He was Killed in Action while defending his position along the Naktong River near Yongsan, South Korea on September 6, 1950. First Lieutenant De Vault was awarded the Purple Heart, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

WEST POINT ASSOCIATION OF GRADUATES MEMORIAL

Milton H. De Vault 1945
1945 Class Crest
Cullum No. 14993 • Sep 06, 1950 • Died in Korea
As parents of an always thoughtful and devoted son, we are privileged to write this Memorial in loving tribute to his honor and memory.
Milton was born in Syracuse, N.Y., on November 10, 1921. From early childhood he came to be known to all as “Bud”. Even in his youthful years he manifested qualities of character and leadership which endeared him to all his friends and associates. These characteristics served him admirably in his Boy Scout activities and in the realm of sports of which he was so fond.
Bud graduated from High School in Amsterdam, N.Y., in 1940, and in the fall of that year entered the University of Tennessee. Successful in his qualifying examinations, he received an appointment to West Point in July 1941, and was graduated from the Academy in June 1945.
After brief training at the Tank Destroyer School, Second Lieutenant De Vault was sent to Japan, where he served with the 302nd Reconnaissance Troop, 1st Cavalry Division, in the Occupation Forces. While there he was cited for his “outstanding performance of duty”. He surveyed many air strips and air fields. He escorted ex-President Hoover and Secretary of War Robert Patterson on their visit to Tokyo, and various foreign dignitaries and high American officers and statesmen who visited Japan while he was there. Bud remained in Japan two and one-half years, and was promoted to First Lieutenant during that time. From Japan he was assigned to Fort Lewis, Washington, in the 72nd Heavy Tank Battalion.
Lieutenant DeVault was married to Gayle Duncan, of Olympia, Washington, in July 1950. After United States troops became involved In the war in Korea, he arrived with his Battalion at Pusau on August 15, 1950. His letters were cheerful and hopeful. As to the manner in which he served his Country, we are indebted to First Lieutenant Robert Carper, of C Company, 72nd Heavy Tank Battalion, who wrote us from Korea on December 28, 1950, as follows:
"On September 6, during the time that we held such a precarious position on the Naktong River, the enemy had penetrated our perimeter to such a depth that the entire front was threatened. Since the North Koreans had succeeded in seizing the high ground overlooking our lines, we were under continuous observation and fire from artillery, tanks and small arms. The enemy continued to strengthen his forces and by massed attack advanced to within 300 yards of the Regimental Command post. To prevent collapse of the position, our Commanding General decided to attack at 1100 hours September 6th, 1950.
“We were greatly outnumbered and knew that the attack would be a hazardous gamble. We knew also that unless this action succeeded not only our own forces would be overrun but that units on our flanks and elements to the rear would be thrown back. When the attack order was being prepared Lieutenant DeVault recommended that the tanks lead the attack. He reasoned that infantry troops would suffer heavy losses advancing against strong enemy forces, well entrenched on high ground, and possessing numerous automatic weapons.
"Lieutenant DeVault volunteered to lead the attack personally. To an officer of his experience he knew that the lead tank would be under the most intense enemy fire; because to repel the attack the enemy would concentrate the fire of all available weapons to stop that tank. We attacked and met concentrated enemy fire. Lieutenant DeVault, standing in the turret of his tank, directed the attack down a road swept by fire, through a small village and assaulted the strongest of the enemy positions. By this time the North Koreans, realizing the relentless determination with which the attack was pushing forward, began to fall back.
"Lieutenant DeVault was hit by enemy fire and immediately lost consciousness, I was riding in his tank at that time and he did not appear to be in pain. He never regained consciousness. To the best of my knowledge his body was interred at the U.S. Military Cemetery, Miryang, Korea.
“During the time that Lieutenant DeVault served with our company he earned the respect and friendship of all who met him. Due to his professional knowledge and thorough grasp of military affairs, he was particularly valuable in training those of us less experienced than he. May I take this opportunity to extend the sympathy of officers and men of C Company and of the entire Battalion. Since Lieutenant DeVault had served with us for such a long period of time, his death was a profound personal loss—mourned by all”.
As parents, we shall ever mourn the loss of a good son. However, it is consoling to know that in our intimate knowledge of him the high purposes of righteous living were strictly adhered to by our boy, and, last, but not least, he has given his life to a most noble cause, the preservation of freedom as exemplified by the United States of America.

OBITUARY - Syracuse Herald Journal; Syracuse, New York; August 7, 1951; page 14 (Ancestry.com)

Lt. DeVault, Korea Victim, Is Buried In Amsterdam
FUNERAL SERVICES were conducted to day in Amsterdam for Lt. Milton H. DeVault, a native Syracusan, who was killed in action in Korea near Yonsan Sept. 6, 1950.
Rites were 2 P.M. in the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. David S. DeVault, 20 Northampton rd.
A graduate of U.S. Military Academy at West Point July 5, 1945, Lieutenant DeVault was sent to Manila, Philippines Islands, in October of that year. He later served with the 302d Reconnaissance Troop Mechanized, First Cavalry Division of the Eighth Army, as executive officer and athletic officer.
While there he received a citation for his outstanding performance of duty. He surveyed many air fields and was given the distinction accorded those who escorted various dignitaries of foreign nations and statesmen, among whom were former President Hoover and Secretary of War Robert Patterson.
Lieutenant DeVault was graduated in March, 1950, from the Army Indoctrination School at Alaska and left for Korea in August of that year as an officer of 72d Heavy Tank Battalion, Second Army. When our front was threatened he led his tanks into battle and was killed on the Nakton River, near Yonson.
HE WORE the American Theater Ribbon, Asiastic-Pacific Theater Ribbon, the Occupation Ribbon for Japan and Army Commendation Ribbon. He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart and a citation from President Trueman.
He was a member of the Emmanuel Presbyterian Church of Amsterdam and a Son of the American Revolution.
Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Gayle Walsh DeVault; an adopted son, Gregory DeVault; his parents; a brother, David S. DeVault, Jr., of Richland, Wash., and a sister, Joan E. DeVault.

MAGAZINE ARTICLE - Ladies Home Journal, February 15, 1951

My Son Died in Korea, by Mrs. David S. DeVault
Even when he was a little boy, Bud was a happy child. Everybody liked Bud. The minister said it when he came in after his death -- Bud always had a twinkle in his eye. He made you feel good.
Isn't it odd -- you'd think it would make me feel bad now to think about him, but it doesn't. I like to think about him.
You've heard about brothers who were friends too. Well, David and Bud were more than that. They were close, always close. "Why couldn't it have been me?" David said when he heard about it. "Everybody liked Bud." That was ridiculous, David is needed just as much as Bud was. But it shows you what Bud meant to him -- what he meant to all of us.
Bud was a towhead with blue eyes and a face full of sunshine. Yet he wasn't just happy-go-lucky. He was good. Not goody-goody -- but good. He liked to get his chores done before he went out to play. He did his homework every night. It's old-fashioned to talk about duty nowadays, but Bud had a sense of duty.
Maybe that's why he wanted to go to West Point. I don't know. You talk to your kids when they are young about the basic things -- like duty, and God. But when they grow up, you can't. You just have to feel your way along once they're grown up. Bud said he wanted to go to West Point because it offered him everything he wanted.
We didn't have much money then. After dad became ill, things weren't easy and Bud knew it. He knew an appointment to West Point would help -- he worked his way through one year at the University of Tennessee, though, before it came through. His competitive exams gave him the rank of second alternate -- two boys had to fail before he could get in. He never believed it would happen. He said if they placed higher on the tests than he did, then, of course, they must be brighter and better prepared and they'd make out. They didn't though. Bud wasn't really what you'd call brilliant, but he had something else. He stuck to things. He worked at them until they came out right.
Let me tell you how he graduated from West Point after those two other boys who had pre-West Point training failed. Bud had never had enough high-school math. And he didn't take any in Tennessee. So he got to West point, and maybe you don't know, but they take mathematics seriously. Bud had to go right into an advanced geometry course -- and sink or swim. Well, he worked on it. He worked so hard that his French suffered. In the middle of the semester it looked like he was gong to flunk both of them, and he called me up. "I'm going to resign," he said. "I thought you ought to know." I couldn't imagine it at first. It didn't seem like Bud. Then I thought about how he hated to fail in anything. So I said, all right, it's your life, but I'm going to come down there and talk to you about it before you do anything. I made him promise he'd wait. I took the next train down to West Point. We found out that two flunks would throw him out of school, but that if he had only one failure, he could get back in -- if he could make up the material he missed and pass tests on it. If he worked on his French now and his math later, he could still make it. There is a place he could go and get nothing but math, a school that specialized in helping West Pointers. It would take three months and $375. Bud, I said, you're a lot like me. If you quit now when you're licked, you'll never get over it. You go take that course, and get back in, and then, if you want to resign, you go ahead and resign.
I had to borrow the money, of course. But Bud tutored at Professor Silverman's, living in his house, for his three months, and then he took his tests and passed them. That summer he went to work to make the $375. The following spring I had to ask him, Bud, do you want to resign Now? "Mother," he said, "you knew me better than I knew myself." And when he got his diploma, do you know what he did? He gave it to me. "Here, you earned it," he said.
I remember when he was in Japan with the occupation. He liked Japan, but then he always liked any place he happened to be. But two years is a long time and he wanted to come home, and he wanted the feel of home. He wrote me that there were three things he wanted: a really beautiful set of golf clubs, a red convertible, and a dog.
Well, I knew I'd better let him get the golf clubs, but I put in for a car. They were hard to get then so I went right down when he wrote that. I even told the man it had to be red, but I didn't care what make it was.
That was about a year before he got home. A month before, I called up. No, he was still way down the list. I told them they just had to get me that car or him. I thought I wasn't going to be able to make it. It was 1948 by then, but they were still hard to get. Just a week before, though, the dealer called and he had a car. Said that it was really for someone else but they could wait. Only thing, it was a gray convertible.
He trusted me for the money and I got the car. Joan and I -- That's our youngest, she's only nineteen -- we went down to the station to meet him. I drove so carefully. When Bud saw the car, he acted like a kid. I'll never forget that ride home. He drove it as if it were a tank, and on the wrong side of the road too the way they do in Japan. The next day we got the dog -- a German shepherd, like one he had when he was a boy.
When he went back west, he drove out in that car, with the dog beside him. It was the last time I ever saw him. He wanted to get back home again, he planned it time and time again, but then there was Hawaii, and Alaska, and then just as he was starting his leave, Korea.
That's why I'm bringing his body home. He did so want to come back again. A West Point friend wanted him buried at the Academy, but I asked David and I asked Gayle -- that's Bud's wife . . . or bride, I Guess -- and they both said, "No, Bud wanted to come home."
Gayle will come with him when he comes. They got married just before he shipped out. I've never met her, but it was she who broke the news to me, not the Army. Someone at the post in Fort Lewis -- that's in Washington -- told her. She called me right away. She tried to tell me gently, but you can't tell something like that any way but straight out.
I thought it was David's wife calling -- they live in Yakima, near Tacoma, where Bud was. It was midnight here and I'd been asleep. But when she said Bud's name, I knew. Joan was just coming in the door and I was standing there, I couldn't say a word, and then I fainted. Joan picked up the phone, and I guess I came to for I went into dad's room. I shouldn't have -- it doesn't do with heart trouble to break news like that suddenly, but I wasn't thinking. I just put my head down on his bed and cried. Poor dad, he had to take care of me that night.
I don't know what went on that next week. It was like I was in a daze. I got somebody in, or they came in, and ran the nursery school -- I put the school in the house six years ago when I had to get some work, but I couldn't leave home. I remember, though, one morning I realized I had to go on living -- that Bud would have wanted me to. Something he said once came back to me suddenly. It was when my sister died. It sounded almost hardhearted to me at the time. He told me not to worry: "A thing that's over with is in the past," he said, "don't look back. Go on."
I took over the nursery that morning, but I didn't last the morning. There's a little prayer we say, and I got as far as the line "God is good" and it stuck in my throat. I couldn't say it. You can't help but think at a time like that that God has let you down. I pulled myself together that night, though, and thought about things.
There's a prayer the cadets say at West Point that helped me back. It always made my heart turn over when I heard them say it. It wasn't just their country they were trained to fight for, but God too. "Encourage us in our endeavor to live above the common level of life," they said. "Make us to choose the harder right instead of the easier wrong and never be content with a half truth when the whole can be won."
Bud chose the harder right. He didn't want to go. He didn't want to leave Gayle. He didn't want to ship out -- he wanted to drive east, and home. But he went, and he went willingly and ready to do his best. He said it when he was on the ship.
He called it a fast scribble. They were going to land at Pusan the next day and he wanted me to know where he was. Wait. I'll read it to you.
"I will miss Gayle, " he wrote, "But now we are on our way, I am glad. That sounds like an Army man, doesn't it? But knowing me, you can see why I feel that way -- I like to get things done rather than wait for them to happen."
All his letters were like that. It was only twenty-two days after he left that he was killed. The last letter I got was just before he crossed the Naktong River and went into action at Yongsan. He wrote so clearly about what went on. I could see it all. I followed him on a map. He thought a lot of the men with him, and told me how brave they were. He especially admired the marines there -- "Braver than ordinary people," he said they were.
His last letter made me so happy -- for, of course, I didn't know it was his last. He was still two miles behind the front and it looked like he might be held there awhile, though he was itching to move up. He was very optimistic: "When we get across the river, we'll really roll -- and push these jokers right back to the 38th parallel." He talked about how it would be over soon, how he would come home, where he would be assigned next after the war, and he wound up, just as always, saying, "Don't worry about me."
I wish I knew what happened then. People say I'm wrong to want to know how he died, that I shouldn't think about it. Bud would have told me, though. He'd know I couldn't sleep nights, imagining trying to live it to the end with him.
People ask me if I am bitter or resentful. No, I am neither. I am resigned. It is the part of mothers always to be giving. Sometimes it is a little; other times it is much. Occasionally we are called on to give our most. My consolation for Bud's loss lies in my faith that he is now "home" -- in "the house of many mansions." I feel we shall meet him again there.
We had a flag ceremony in the school. I don't think the youngsters get enough these days about their flag and what it stands for. I was playing The Star-Spangled Banner for them to march to and they were singing it, as best they could, the way children do, when I suddenly thought, "This is for Bud," and my hands started trembling. "He died for his country, and for these children, and millions of other children."
"One of my friends, who knew Bud from the time he was little, wrote me something I'll never forget. It made me feel proud and humble, both.
"Comfort yourself," she said, "with the knowledge that with all his fine abilities and his good record, he was ours."
Yes, God was good to me, I thought, I had a fine son.

NEWSPAPER ARTICLE - Morning Olympian (Olympia, Washington); Tuesday, July 24, 1951; Page: 1 ; (GenealogyBank.com):

War Dead Return
The bodies of two Olympia men who died in Korea are being returned to the United States aboard the Baylor Victory, scheduled to dock at San Francisco today.
They are First lieutenant Milton H. Devault, husband of Mrs. Milton H, Devault, 1608 Jefferson Street, and Sergeant John R. McDuffee, husband of Mrs. Wilma L. McDuffee, Route Eight, Box 384A.

NEWSPAPER ARTICLE - Morning Olympian (Olympia, Washington); Thursday, August 9, 1951; Page: 11; (Genealogy Bank.com):

Lieutenant DeVault
A Funeral service for First Lieutenant Milton H. DeVault was held recently in Amsterdam, New York. Lieutenant DeVault who married Gayle Walsh Duncan of Olympia just a year ago, was killed in action in Korea last September.
He and Gayle Elaine Walsh had children in No Children.7

Citations

  1. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  2. [S1575] 1930 Census, Connecticut, Fairfield County
  3. [S12347] WWI, WWII and Korean War Casualty Listing (Ancestry.Com)
  4. [S5553] Genealogy prepared by David Sullins DeVault (see photo album images)
  5. [S8799] Marriage Records - Washington, County Marriages, 1855 - 2008
  6. [S11941] Phone conversation with Joan Esther (DeVault) Snyder, July 29, 2011
  7. [S2717] Book: A DeVault Genealogy with Gillmore and Hunt Supplements by William B. Gillmore, 1954

Gayle Elaine Walsh1,2,3

F, #15911, b. 30 September 1918, d. 1 August 2001

Parents

Pedigree Link

Family: Milton Henry "Bud" DeVault (b. 10 November 1921, d. 6 September 1950)

SonGregory Duncan-DeVault

BASIC FACTS

Gayle Elaine Walsh was born on 30 September 1918 in Bellingham, Whatcom Co., Washington.4 She and Milton Henry "Bud" DeVault were married on 12 July 1950 in Thurston Co., Washington.5,2 She died on 1 August 2001, at age 82.4
Gayle Elaine Walsh was also known as Gale Duncan.6 She had reference number 16199. She resided in Everett, Snohomish Co., Washington (1935); of Seattle, King Co., Washington.6,3 Her Social Security Number was 535-12-9070, issued: Washington, last residence: Sun City, Riverside Co., California.4,7 She was enumerated on the census in Whatcom County, Washington (1920); Snohomish County, Washington (1930); Whatcom County, Washington (1940.)

Previously married to Unknown Duncan. After Bud was killed, Gayle was married to Unknown Brown and Thomas A. Howatt. Gayle seemed to be using the "DeVault" surname at the time of her death.

Dec 1939: Name listed as GAYLE ELAINE WALSH;
Aug 1948: Name listed as GAYLE ELAINE DUNCAN;
Jan 1951: Name listed as GAYLE WALSH DEVAULT;
Jan 1965: Name listed as GAYLE WALSH BROWN;
May 1967: Name listed as GAYLE WALSH HOWATT;
13 May 1983: Name listed as GAYLE WALSH HOWATT.
She and Milton Henry "Bud" DeVault had children in No Children.1

Citations

  1. [S2717] Book: A DeVault Genealogy with Gillmore and Hunt Supplements by William B. Gillmore, 1954
  2. [S8799] Marriage Records - Washington, County Marriages, 1855 - 2008
  3. [S2331] 1940 Census, Washington, Whatcom County
  4. [S12093] U.S. Social Security Application and Claims Index, 1936 - 2007 (Ancestry.com)
  5. [S5553] Genealogy prepared by David Sullins DeVault (see photo album images)
  6. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  7. [S12038] Social Security Death Index, Source Medium: Book

Joan Esther DeVault1,2,3

F, #15912, b. 6 March 1930, d. 11 April 2013

Parents

FatherDavid Sullins DeVault (b. 19 December 1876, d. 7 July 1963)
MotherEsther Miller Waldron (b. 10 August 1893, d. 14 April 1963)
Pedigree Link

Family: Duane L. Snyder (b. 5 February 1919, d. 26 July 2002)

DaughterLiving Snyder+
SonDerek Snyder
DaughterLiving Snyder+

BASIC FACTS

Joan Esther DeVault was born on 6 March 1930 in New York City, New York Co., New York.1,4 She and Duane L. Snyder were married on 1 January 1955 in Amsterdam, Montgomery Co., New York.5,6,7 She died on 11 April 2013, at age 83, in Amsterdam, Montgomery Co., New York.8 She was buried in Fairview Cemetery, Amsterdam, Montgomery Co., New York.9
Joan Esther DeVault had reference number 16200. She was enumerated on the census in Fairfield County, Connecticut (1930.) She was an Employed in the A&OS Department of the General Electric Company; self-employed, designed and sewed custom textiles and quilts. Taught children at the Theodore Roosevelt Junior High School in Amsterdam and was a teacher at a nursery school for many years.5,8 She was educated Graduate of Wilbur H. Lynch High School; attended Buffalo State Teachers College and the Albright School of Art in Buffalo, New York.5,8

OBITUARY - Publication RecorderNews.com , April 12, 2013, Page 04122013_Snyder

Joan E. Snyder of Amsterdam passed away peacefully at home on April 11, 2013. Her loving children were by her side.
She was born in New York City on March 6, 1930 the daughter of the late David S. and Esther Waldron DeVault.
Joan was a self-employed, she designed and sewed custom textiles and quilts. She attended Albright School of Art in Buffalo, NY. She enjoyed swimming and taught children at the Theodore Roosevelt Junior High School in Amsterdam. She was also a teacher at a nursery school for many years.
Joan enjoyed tennis, but most of all loved to ski, traveling the United States to various mountains as well as traveling to ski in Argentina.
She married Duane Snyder on January 1, 1955 they shared a beautiful union of over forty five years until his passing in 2002.
Her loving family includes her son, Derek Snyder of Rexford, daughters Gretchen J. Pawling (Peter) of Amsterdam and Becki J. LaGrange (Watson) of Fort Johnson and grandchildren Nicholas Pawling (Amanda), Melissa Klementowski and Anthony Sculco.
A memorial service will be held on Sunday, April 13, 2013 at 3:30 pm at the Betz Rossi & Bellinger Family Funeral Home, 171 Guy Park Ave. Amsterdam NY 12010, with the Rev. Cynthia Leonard will officiating.
Family and friends are invited to visit from 2:00 pm until 3:30pm prior to the service at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in her memory to the Community Hospice of Amsterdam, the American Cancer Society or the Montgomery County SPCA.
Please visit the family's online guestbook at http://www.brbsfuneral.com/.


MARRIAGE ANNOUNCEMENT (photo)

Miss DeVault Is Married in New Year's Day Ceremony
Miss Joan E. DeVault, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David S. DeVault of Amsterdam was married New Year's Day to Duane L. Snyder, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Snyder also of Amsterdam.
The candlelight ceremony was held at 4 p.m. in the Emmanuel Presbyterian Church and a reception followed at the home of the bride's parents, 20 Northampton road. Rev. M.C.T. Andreae officiated.
Wears Heirloom Gown
Miss Clara Nelson, organist, played traditional wedding music in the church, decorated with tall standards of white flowers, fir trees and laurel garlanding.
The bride escorted by her brother, David S. DeVault Jr. Benten City, Wash., wore an heirloom silk gown with a pleated skirt and bodice overlaid with chantilly lace and sequins. Her snug sequined cap held a fingertip illusion veil. As a bouquet, she held a cascade of white roses and holly leaves.
The maid of honor was Miss Martha J. Conney and the bridesmaids were Mrs. David Stone and Miss Marilyn Cross, all of Amsterdam. They wore deep red velvet dresses, waltz length, and carried crescents of white poinsettias. The maid of honor had a matching feather headpiece and the bridesmaids wore holly tiaras.
Melvin T. Woodhead Jr. of Scotia was best man and the ushers were George F. McGrath, Bloomfield, NJ, and John F. Ryan Jr. Scotia.
Mrs. DeVault worn an aqua gown with bronze accessories for her daughter's wedding and the bridegroom's mother was attired in a coffee-colored dress with matching hat and gloves.
On Skiing Trip
After the home reception, Mr. and Mrs. Snyder left on a skiing trip to Lake Placid and Canada, the bride wearing a black and white wool dress, black coat and white hat and gloves. They will be home Saturday at 45 Stewart Street, Amsterdam.
Mrs. Snyder, who is employed in the A&OS Department at the General Electric Co., is a graduate of Wilbur H. Lynch High School and attended Buffalo State Teachers College and the Albright Art School.
Her husband, a graduate of the same high school, is with the engineering department of Socony Vacuum Oil Co., Albany.

Citations

  1. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  2. [S2717] Book: A DeVault Genealogy with Gillmore and Hunt Supplements by William B. Gillmore, 1954
  3. [S1575] 1930 Census, Connecticut, Fairfield County
  4. [S5511] Genealogy prepared by Dan DeVault
  5. [S8543] Marriage Announcement - Duane L. Snyder & Joan Ester DeVault
  6. [S11941] Phone conversation with Joan Esther (DeVault) Snyder, July 29, 2011
  7. [S5553] Genealogy prepared by David Sullins DeVault (see photo album images)
  8. [S10429] Obituary - Joan Esther (DeVault) Snyder
  9. [S4861] Find A Grave (Internet), Source Medium: Book

Mabel Summers1,2

F, #15913
Pedigree Link

BASIC FACTS

Mabel Summers and Clyde Lee DeVault were married in May 1915 in Point Comfort (now Old Point Comfort), Hampton Co., Virginia.1,3
Mabel Summers had reference number 16201.

Citations

  1. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  2. [S3269] Death Certificate - Clyde Lee DeVault
  3. [S2717] Book: A DeVault Genealogy with Gillmore and Hunt Supplements by William B. Gillmore, 1954

Anne Goodman1,2,3,4

F, #15914, b. 15 March 1894, d. June 1970

Parents

Pedigree Link

BASIC FACTS

Anne Goodman was born on 15 March 1894 in New York.2,5,4 She and Henry Shryock DeVault were married on 19 March 1923 in No. 73 Szechuen Road, Shanghai, China.2 She died in June 1970, at age 76.5
Anne Goodman was also known as Ann Goodmans.6 She had reference number 16202. She was an Exporter.6 She resided in New York City, New York Co., New York.7 Her Social Security Number was 126-14-2841, issued: New York, last residence: New York, New York Co., New York.5 She was enumerated on the census in New York County, New York (1900.)

After Henry's death, Anne (Goodman) DeVault returned to New York with her sister-in-law and family where she remained for a short time. She traveled to Monte Carlo, Monaco and the family lost track of her. The Social Security Death Index shows that she returned to New York City and was living there when she died.

Citations

  1. [S2717] Book: A DeVault Genealogy with Gillmore and Hunt Supplements by William B. Gillmore, 1954
  2. [S12068] U.S. Consular Reports of Marriages 1910 - 1949 (Ancestry.com)
  3. [S12085] U.S. Passport Applications, 1795 - 1925 (Ancestry.com)
  4. [S596] 1900 Census, New York, New York County
  5. [S12037] Social Security Death Index, Source Medium: Book
  6. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  7. [S5511] Genealogy prepared by Dan DeVault

Byrne Aloyisus Padon1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #15915, b. 1 February 1892, d. 23 August 1974

Parents

Pedigree Link

Family: Emily Kathleen DeVault (b. 25 November 1888, d. 14 April 1963)

SonLiving Padon+
SonRobert Byrne Padon+ (b. 8 December 1927, d. 27 April 1996)

BASIC FACTS

Byrne Aloyisus Padon was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He was born on 1 February 1892 in St. Louis, St. Louis Co., Missouri.7 He and Emily Kathleen DeVault were married in June 1922 in Shanghai, China. He died on 23 August 1974, at age 82, in Houston, Harris Co., Texas.7,8,9 He was buried in Forest Park Westheimer Cemetery, Houston, Harris Co., Texas.9,10
Byrne Aloyisus Padon was also known as Bryne A. Paden.11 He was also known as Byrne A. Paden.12 He had reference number 16203. He was an Accountant for Haskins and Sells (1917, 1920); assistant to his brother-in-law, Henry DeVault; Accountant (death certificate.)11,9 He was enumerated on the census in Saint Louis County, Missouri (1900, 1910.) His Social Security Number was 442-05-7588, issued: Oklahoma, last residence: Houston, Harris Co., Texas.9,7

Seattle Passenger and Crew Lists, 1882-1957
Name: Byrne A. Padon, US address: Haskins & Sells, Tulsa, OK.
Male; Age: 31, born Feb. 01, 1892 Saint Louis, MO
Ship Name: President Jackson
Port of Arrival: Seattle, Washington, Mar 06, 1923;
Port of Departure: Shanghai, China Feb 18 1923.

California Passenger and Crew Lists, 1893-1957
Name: Byrne Padon
Arrival Date: 11 Aug 1926
Age: 34
Birth Date: abt 1892
Birthplace: St Louis, Missouri, United States
Gender: Male
Ship Name: President Taft
Port of Arrival: San Francisco, California
Port of Departure: Shanghai, China

GRAVE MARKER

PADON

BYRNE A. EMILY D.
1892 – 1974 1888 – 1963.

Citations

  1. [S12020] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  2. [S12033] Seattle Passenger and Crew Lists, 1882-1957; (Ancestry), Source Medium: Book
  3. [S2784] California Passenger and Crew Lists, 1882-1957 (Ancestry.com)
  4. [S570] 1900 Census, Missouri, Saint Louis County
  5. [S908] 1910 Census, Missouri, Saint Louis County
  6. [S11872] One World Tree; (Ancestry.com)
  7. [S12037] Social Security Death Index, Source Medium: Book
  8. [S3928] Death Records - Texas, Texas Death Index (1903 - 2000) (Ancestry.com)
  9. [S3228] Death Certificate - Byrne A. Padon
  10. [S3326] Death Certificate - Emily K. (DeVault) Padon)
  11. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  12. [S2717] Book: A DeVault Genealogy with Gillmore and Hunt Supplements by William B. Gillmore, 1954

Conley Earl "Earl" Ball1,2,3,4,5

M, #15916, b. 23 September 1883, d. 31 October 1940

Parents

FatherJames Franklin Ball (b. 23 July 1857, d. 29 September 1890)
MotherAlta E. Kendrick (b. 15 December 1861, d. 7 June 1892)
Pedigree Link

Family: Eula Lee Kendrick (b. 13 March 1888, d. 20 October 1959)

DaughterDorothy Virginia Ball+ (b. 1 December 1923, d. 14 November 2011)

BASIC FACTS

Conley Earl "Earl" Ball was born on 23 September 1883 in Elk Garden, Russell Co., Virginia.6,2,7 He and Eula Lee Kendrick were married on 20 December 1920 in Washington Co., Virginia.6 He died on 31 October 1940, at age 57.8 He was buried in East Hill Cemetery, Bristol, Sullivan Co., Tennessee.8
Conley Earl "Earl" Ball had reference number 16204. He was a Railway mail clerk (1917); realtor - real estate (1930); real estate salesman - own office (1940.)2,7,5 He was enumerated on the census in Washington County, Virginia (1900); Bristol City County, Virginia (1930, 1940.) He resided in New York City, New York Co., New York.7 U.S. Army, Captain.8

Both of Earl's parents died young. He is shown living with his grandparents in the 1900 Census.

Citations

  1. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  2. [S1962] 1930 Census, Virginia, Bristol City County
  3. [S7199] Genealogy prepared by tcoffee143 (Ancestry.com)
  4. [S692] 1900 Census, Virginia, Washington County
  5. [S2321] 1940 Census, Virginia, Bristol City County
  6. [S4003] Descendants of William Lee Ball prepared by George G. Morgan
  7. [S12085] U.S. Passport Applications, 1795 - 1925 (Ancestry.com)
  8. [S4861] Find A Grave (Internet), Source Medium: Book

Willard Dana Bell1,2,3,4

M, #15917, b. 13 July 1909, d. 9 February 1965

Parents

Pedigree Link

Family: Jessie Latture (b. 10 December 1909, d. 3 May 2012)

SonWilliam Eugene Bell+
DaughterDonna Louise Bell, M.D. (b. 14 September 1936, d. 29 September 1995)

BASIC FACTS

Willard Dana Bell was born on 13 July 1909 in Tennessee.3 He and Jessie Latture were married on 27 July 1932 in Ada Co., Idaho.5,2 He died on 9 February 1965, at age 55, in Boise, Ada Co., Idaho.3 He was buried in Morris Hill Cemetery, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho.3
Willard Dana Bell had reference number 16205. He was enumerated on the census in Knox County, Tennessee (1910); Oconee County, South Carolina (1920); Ada County, Idaho (1940.) He was a Projectionist - theater (1940.)4

GRAVE MARKER

WILLARD DANA BELL
IDAHO
PFC US ARMY
WORLD WAR II
JULY 13 1909 FEB 9 1965.

Citations

  1. [S6946] Genealogy prepared by Robert Weller (email address)
  2. [S6916] Genealogy prepared by RJ_Samp (Ancestry.com)
  3. [S7131] Genealogy prepared by sphin6208 (Ancestry.com)
  4. [S2063] 1940 Census, Idaho, Ada County
  5. [S8805] Marriage Records - Western States Marriage Index 1808 - 2011 (internet)

Carlisle S. Abbott1

M, #15918
Pedigree Link

BASIC FACTS

Carlisle S. Abbott had reference number 16206.

Citations

  1. [S9199] Obituary - Arline Abbot Reeves

Sidney Bulo Scott1,2,3,4,5,6

M, #15919, b. 8 March 1848, d. 8 June 1924

Parents

Pedigree Link

Family: Laura Theresa DeVault (b. 14 October 1854, d. 6 June 1928)

DaughterMary Willis "Willie" Scott+ (b. 14 January 1876, d. 2 May 1959)
SonJunius Washington " June" Scott+ (b. 3 October 1878, d. 30 September 1971)
SonSamuel Dwight Scott+ (b. 6 April 1881, d. 31 December 1932)
DaughterBeulah Viola "Birdie" Scott (b. November 1882, d. 19 February 1958)
DaughterL. Victoria Scott (b. April 1884)
SonLucious DeVault Scott (b. September 1886, d. 8 January 1910)
DaughterKatherine Magdalene "Kate" Scott (b. May 1888, d. 2 July 1976)
SonFrank Pierce Scott+ (b. 12 March 1894, d. 16 November 1970)
SonMack Payton Scott+ (b. July 1895, d. 29 November 1957)

BASIC FACTS

Sidney Bulo Scott was born on 8 March 1848 in Burke Co., North Carolina.7,1 He and Laura Theresa DeVault were married on 4 October 1874 in Burke Co., North Carolina.8,1 He died on 8 June 1924, at age 76, in Silver Creek, Burke Co., North Carolina.7,9 He died on 1 February 1926, at age 77.1 He died on 6 June 1928, at age 80.7 He was buried in Glen Alpine Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Glen Alpine, Burke Co., North Carolina.10
Sidney Bulo Scott was also known as Sidney Bulow Scott.8,7,2 He had reference number 16207. He was a Manager of farm (1870); farmer (1880, 1900, 1920.)2,5,6 He was enumerated on the census in Burke County, North Carolina (1850 - 1880, 1900 - 1920.)9

GRAVE MARKER

SIDNEY BULO SCOTT
MAR. 8, 1848
JUNE 8, 1924.

Citations

  1. [S6552] Genealogy prepared by Martyn Martin (email address)
  2. [S600] 1900 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  3. [S1345] 1920 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  4. [S932] 1910 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  5. [S186] 1870 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  6. [S326] 1880 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  7. [S7413] Genealogy prepared by William B. Terrell
  8. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  9. [S6237] Genealogy prepared by Juliana Ward Bujalski (Ancestry.com)
  10. [S8150] Grave Marker - Sidney Bulo Scott, Glen Alpine Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Glen Alpine, Burke Co., North Carolina

Mary Willis "Willie" Scott1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8

F, #15920, b. 14 January 1876, d. 2 May 1959

Parents

FatherSidney Bulo Scott (b. 8 March 1848, d. 8 June 1924)
MotherLaura Theresa DeVault (b. 14 October 1854, d. 6 June 1928)
Pedigree Link

Family: George Edgar Patton (b. 2 December 1874, d. 27 March 1959)

DaughterIva Ida Patton+ (b. 2 January 1902, d. 3 April 1986)
DaughterMae Musette Patton (b. 29 May 1904, d. 29 August 1978)
DaughterLacey Livingston "Livingston" Patton (b. 30 March 1907, d. 6 January 2000)

BASIC FACTS

Mary Willis "Willie" Scott was born on 14 January 1876 in Burke Co., North Carolina.2,9 She and George Edgar Patton were married on 4 September 1900 in Glen Alpine, Burke Co., North Carolina.2,9 She died on 2 May 1959, at age 83.2 She was buried in Glen Alpine Cemetery, Glen Alpine, Burke Co., North Carolina.2,10 She was buried in First Methodist Cemetery, Burke Co., North Carolina.9
Mary Willis "Willie" Scott had reference number 16208. She resided in of Glen Alpine, Burke Co., North Carolina.1 She was enumerated on the census in Burke County, North Carolina (1880, 1900 - 1940.)

GRAVE MARKER

MARY W. SCOTT PATTON
WIFE OF
GEORGE E. PATTON
JAN. 14, 1876
MAY 2, 1959.

Citations

  1. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  2. [S7413] Genealogy prepared by William B. Terrell
  3. [S600] 1900 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  4. [S932] 1910 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  5. [S1345] 1920 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  6. [S1827] 1930 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  7. [S326] 1880 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  8. [S2222] 1940 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  9. [S3979] Descendants of John Harper Patton prepared by Kellye Neff
  10. [S4861] Find A Grave (Internet), Source Medium: Book

George Edgar Patton1,2,3,4,4,5

M, #15921, b. 2 December 1874, d. 27 March 1959

Parents

FatherJoseph Erwin Patton (b. 18 November 1838, d. 22 October 1880)
MotherAnna Marie Howard
Pedigree Link

Family: Mary Willis "Willie" Scott (b. 14 January 1876, d. 2 May 1959)

DaughterIva Ida Patton+ (b. 2 January 1902, d. 3 April 1986)
DaughterMae Musette Patton (b. 29 May 1904, d. 29 August 1978)
DaughterLacey Livingston "Livingston" Patton (b. 30 March 1907, d. 6 January 2000)

BASIC FACTS

George Edgar Patton was born on 2 December 1874 in Silver Creek, Burke Co., North Carolina.2,6 He and Mary Willis "Willie" Scott were married on 4 September 1900 in Glen Alpine, Burke Co., North Carolina.2,6 He died on 27 March 1954, at age 79.2 He died on 27 March 1959, at age 84, in Burke Co., North Carolina.6 He was buried in Pleasant Grove Church Cemetery, Lincolnton, North Carolina.2
George Edgar Patton had reference number 16209. He was a Livery man - own stable (1910); merchant - jewelry (1930.)3,4 He was enumerated on the census in Burke County, North Carolina (1910 - 1940.)

Citations

  1. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  2. [S7413] Genealogy prepared by William B. Terrell
  3. [S932] 1910 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  4. [S1345] 1920 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  5. [S2222] 1940 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  6. [S3979] Descendants of John Harper Patton prepared by Kellye Neff

Frank Pierce Scott1,2,3,4,5,6,7

M, #15922, b. 12 March 1894, d. 16 November 1970

Parents

FatherSidney Bulo Scott (b. 8 March 1848, d. 8 June 1924)
MotherLaura Theresa DeVault (b. 14 October 1854, d. 6 June 1928)
Pedigree Link

Family: Artie Mildred Pritchard (b. 9 August 1896, d. 10 April 1976)

SonLucius Long "Buck" Scott+ (b. 13 September 1919, d. 31 October 1991)
DaughterCharlie Mae Scott+ (b. 18 October 1920, d. 2 July 2007)
DaughterCarolyn Elizabeth Scott+ (b. 4 June 1922, d. 2 August 1995)
DaughterPauleen Scott (b. 19 January 1924, d. 23 December 1929)
DaughterIna Inez Scott (b. 14 October 1926, d. 12 November 1993)
SonThomas Alexander "Scottie" Scott+ (b. 17 January 1930, d. 2 July 2002)

BASIC FACTS

Frank Pierce Scott was born on 12 March 1884 in Burke Co., North Carolina.2 He was born in March 1890 in Burke Co., North Carolina.3 He was born on 12 March 1894 in Burke Co., North Carolina.8,9 He and Artie Mildred Pritchard were married on 4 December 1918 in Burke Co., North Carolina.10 He died on 16 November 1970, at age 76, in Glen Alpine, Burke Co., North Carolina.2,8,10
Frank Pierce Scott had reference number 16210. He was enumerated on the census in Burke Co., North Carolina (1900 - 1940.) He was a Farm laborer (1910); farmer - general farming (1920); laborer - furniture shop (1930); packer - furniture shop (1940.)4,5,6,7 His Social Security Number was 238-05-2539, issued: North Carolina, last residence: Glen Alpine, Burke Co., North Carolina.8

Citations

  1. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  2. [S7413] Genealogy prepared by William B. Terrell
  3. [S600] 1900 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  4. [S1827] 1930 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  5. [S932] 1910 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  6. [S1345] 1920 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  7. [S2222] 1940 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  8. [S12037] Social Security Death Index, Source Medium: Book
  9. [S6552] Genealogy prepared by Martyn Martin (email address)
  10. [S6237] Genealogy prepared by Juliana Ward Bujalski (Ancestry.com)

Mack Payton Scott1,2,3,4

M, #15923, b. July 1895, d. 29 November 1957

Parents

FatherSidney Bulo Scott (b. 8 March 1848, d. 8 June 1924)
MotherLaura Theresa DeVault (b. 14 October 1854, d. 6 June 1928)
Pedigree Link

Family: Jeanette "Jennie" Rose (b. 2 January 1892, d. 31 August 1978)

SonLiving Scott
DaughterLiving Scott
SonLiving Scott
DaughterLiving Scott
SonLiving Scott

BASIC FACTS

Mack Payton Scott was born in July 1895 in Burke Co., North Carolina.5 He was born on 12 July 1898.1 He and Jeanette "Jennie" Rose were married on 10 May 1919.1 He died on 12 November 1957, at age 62.6 He died on 29 November 1957, at age 62.1,7
Mack Payton Scott was also known as Max Scott.8 He had reference number 16211. He was enumerated on the census in Burke County, North Carolina (1910 - 1930.) He was a Farmer - general farming (1920); carpenter - tannery (1930.)2,4

Citations

  1. [S7413] Genealogy prepared by William B. Terrell
  2. [S1827] 1930 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  3. [S932] 1910 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  4. [S1345] 1920 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  5. [S600] 1900 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  6. [S6552] Genealogy prepared by Martyn Martin (email address)
  7. [S7417] Genealogy prepared by William Douglas "Doug" Terrell
  8. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book

Junius Washington " June" Scott1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9

M, #15924, b. 3 October 1878, d. 30 September 1971

Parents

FatherSidney Bulo Scott (b. 8 March 1848, d. 8 June 1924)
MotherLaura Theresa DeVault (b. 14 October 1854, d. 6 June 1928)
Pedigree Link

Family: Laura Estelle Dale (b. 18 September 1887, d. 14 March 1962)

DaughterLiving Scott
DaughterLiving Scott
SonRobert S. Scott (b. 21 July 1906, d. 29 March 1936)
DaughterAlpha Victoria Scott+ (b. 26 May 1908, d. 16 June 1990)
SonJohn Woodrow Scott (b. 12 January 1913, d. 25 April 1996)
SonJames Lenoir Scott+ (b. 20 May 1915, d. 18 September 1971)
SonFrank Edward Scott (b. 13 February 1918, d. 12 January 1999)
DaughterCarrie E. Scott+ (b. about 1922)
DaughterAilene W. Scott (b. 21 August 1924, d. 1 August 1962)
DaughterEvelyne S. Scott (b. 19 October 1928, d. 16 January 1993)

BASIC FACTS

Junius Washington " June" Scott was born on 3 October 1878 in Burke Co., North Carolina.2,10 He and Laura Estelle Dale were married on 16 August 1903.2 He died on 30 September 1971, at age 92, in Morganton, Burke Co., North Carolina.2,11 He was buried in Gibbs Chapel Wesleyan Church Cemetery, Glen Alpine, Burke Co., North Carolina.12
Junius Washington " June" Scott was also known as Junvis Washington Scott.10 He had reference number 16212. He was a Farm laborer (1900); farmer - general farming (1910 - 1930); laborer - farm (1940.)4,5,6,9 He was enumerated on the census in Burke County, North Carolina (1880, 1900 - 1940.)

In the 1940 Census, June and Laura are living apart and Laura is listed as widowed.

Citations

  1. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  2. [S7413] Genealogy prepared by William B. Terrell
  3. [S7417] Genealogy prepared by William Douglas "Doug" Terrell
  4. [S1345] 1920 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  5. [S1827] 1930 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  6. [S932] 1910 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  7. [S600] 1900 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  8. [S326] 1880 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  9. [S2222] 1940 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  10. [S6552] Genealogy prepared by Martyn Martin (email address)
  11. [S3506] Death Certificate - Junius Washington " June" Scott
  12. [S2966] Cemetery Records, Gibbs Chapel Wesleyan Church, Glen Alpine, Burke Co., North Carolina

Samuel Dwight Scott1,2,3,4,5,6,7

M, #15925, b. 6 April 1881, d. 31 December 1932

Parents

FatherSidney Bulo Scott (b. 8 March 1848, d. 8 June 1924)
MotherLaura Theresa DeVault (b. 14 October 1854, d. 6 June 1928)
Pedigree Link

Family: Alice Victoria "Victoria" Graham (b. 10 September 1886, d. 24 April 1983)

DaughterLiving Scott
DaughterLiving Scott
DaughterLiving Scott
DaughterLiving Scott
SonEdgar Bulo Scott (b. 9 December 1905, d. February 1972)
SonAlfred Dwight Scott (b. 4 December 1907, d. 20 December 1979)
SonGeorge Ernest Scott (b. 13 November 1909, d. 4 January 1969)
DaughterSamuel H. Scott (b. 7 July 1920, d. January 1974)

BASIC FACTS

Samuel Dwight Scott was born in April 1880 in Burke Co., North Carolina.8,3 He was born on 6 April 1881 in Burke Co., North Carolina.5 He and Alice Victoria "Victoria" Graham were married on 10 January 1905 in Burke Co., North Carolina.2,8 He died on 31 December 1932, at age 51.2 He was buried in Glen Alpine Methodist Cemetery, Glen Alpine, Burke Co., North Carolina.5
Samuel Dwight Scott had reference number 16213. He was a Farm laborer (1900); farmer - general farming (1910 - 1930.)3,4,6,7 He was enumerated on the census in Burke County, North Carolina (1900, 1910, 1930.)

Citations

  1. [S12019] Report on Henry Dewald and Family by Newland DeVault dated 1975, Source Medium: Book
  2. [S7413] Genealogy prepared by William B. Terrell
  3. [S600] 1900 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  4. [S1827] 1930 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  5. [S5693] Genealogy prepared by Dr. Ed Ellis (email address)
  6. [S932] 1910 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  7. [S1345] 1920 Census, North Carolina, Burke County
  8. [S6552] Genealogy prepared by Martyn Martin (email address)